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Dear Doolina,

I want a job.

Sincerely,
Undergrad-Soon-To-Be-Unemployed

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Dear Undergrad-Soon-To-Be-Unemployed,

That’s not really a question … but let’s see what little old Doolina can do to help anyway. The most crucial part to getting a job is — wait for it — applying to jobs. Shocking, I know. But seriously, you’ll never get a job unless you send in an application, or you’re the heir to the Woodruff fortune (if you are, have you ever thought about measuring your wealth in terms of liters of coke?). Regularly scour through Eagle Ops, career websites (Idealist, Monster, etc.) and the employment pages of any organizations at which you can see yourself working, and make a spreadsheet of jobs that might be a good fit. The next step is to work your connections. You don’t have to be a Woodruff to have connections, you can make them! Reach out to Emory alumni or other people at prospective organizations you’re looking at, and ask to talk to them about their career paths and if there are any opportunities for someone like you. If you put in enough time and dedication, you’re bound to get a job eventually.

PS: Once you get to the interview stage, try to be a bit more thorough in your answers than you were with with your question … or, at least, don’t call “communication skills” one of your strengths if they ask.

Delightfully,

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Dear Doolina,

I’m at the sort of ethical crossroads many college students experience when opening themselves to new people and ideas and need your advice. In high school, I watched “The Bachelor” religiously with my friends, as a convenient and silly way to stay connected and have fun. Now that I’m at Emory, I’ve realized that a lot of aspects of the show (and its spin-offs and spin-offs of spin-offs) are a bit problematic, to say the least. My friends back home still watch, and I want to watch with them so I can keep up with the weekly gossip. Despite my qualms with the show, I still have a blast watching it and don’t want to stop. As a recently declared Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies major and a feminist, am I violating everything I stand for by continuing to watch “The Bachelor”?

Sincerely,
Am I watching “The Bachelor” for the Right Reasons?
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Dear “Bachelor” Fan,

I’m glad you have chosen to confide in me, as I too am a member of #BachelorNation. Not only that, but a proud member (come to my weekly viewing parties, mkay? You can bring the wine and I’ll bring the sassy comments). Many members of the immortal community have chastised me and called me a hypocrite for calling myself a feminist AND a “Bachelor” lover. Nonetheless, I firmly believe you can be both. If, like me, you love the ridiculous drama and 100 percent unscripted plot, who’s to tell you what you should and should not watch? Is it sexist that there’ll be two bachelorettes next season, putting the power back in the men’s hands, as it has so often been, historically speaking? Absolutely. Were the farm puns this season a bit too corny, even for your tastes (sorry, couldn’t help myself)? Definitely. Do you ever wonder if Chris Harrison knows any other words besides “ladies,” “gentlemen,” and “this is the final rose”? Me too. But no show, no idea is perfect. Queen B herself rubbed some the wrong way when she and Jay-Z glamorized gun violence in their “On the Run” trailer, but does that for one second mean I no longer find her flawless? Heck no, I’m still crazy in love with her.

The point is, watch what you want to watch. Enjoy those two hours spent relaxing and laughing with your friends every Monday night while simultaneously acknowledging the problems “The Bachelor” presents and represents. We should be trying to expand our choices and views of what is acceptable, not limit them. And if any one of your Emory friends tells you to stop watching “The Bachelor,” just know they’re probably the Juan Pablo of your friend group (which is, contrary to JP might say, not ok).

Delightfully,

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Dear Doolina,

I’m a junior — you can call me Abbi. But one of my best friends at Emory — you can call her Ilana — is a senior and I can’t bear the thought of what will happen to our friendship once she graduates. How can I keep up the friendship, even after we’re separated physically?

Sincerely,
BFFs

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Dear BFFs,

Here are a couple tried-and-true methods for keeping up a friendship. As Abbi and Ilana from “Broad City” have taught us:

  1. Facetime each other all the time, no matter what you’re doing. Even if you’re in the bathroom. Or in bed. Or in Bed, Bath & Beyond. Just make sure you turn on the WiFi.
  2. Try to plan some sort of regular visit if you can. Of course money and schedules might make this hard, but you can usually make it work if you plan far enough in advance and are willing to scope out the good travel deals (megabus, theflightdeal.com). Visits give you something to look forward to and are a way of committing yourself to your friendship.
  3. Regularity is key! Dooley only calls me at 8 p.m. on certain weekdays, because that’s when he drives home from work. I call my Grandma Doola on Sundays. Setting up a regular, consistent schedule is an easy way to ingrain your friendship into your daily habits, thereby making it easier to keep it up.
  4. Send each other Buzzfeed links. Because what says friendship more than incredibly relevant Buzzfeed lists that pierce your soul? (Yes, I recognize this article includes a list. No, I am not copying Buzzfeed’s wildly successful “listicle” format. Yes, I may have been subconsciously influenced by it.)
  5. Remember why you became friends in the first place. If it’s a strong friendship, it will outlast time and overcome distance, and you’ll be friends for life.

Delightfully,

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