Outside the Emory Bubble, Best Bites of the Summer

Three years ago, when I was a freshman, the restaurant world seemed so small. I was trapped in the Emory Bubble — a meal in the Emory Village was a treat; eating off campus felt like opening a present on Christmas morning.

This summer I escaped the bubble, lived in Midtown and, for the first time, had a car. As the dining intern at Atlanta magazine, I was also responsible for knowing every bit of food news out there.

Over the three months I spent eating around the city there were six dishes that stood out to me. Some of the restaurants may be a tinge pricey for a college budget, but if your parents are still around helping you unpack, tell them that you love them and that you deserve this one last treat before they leave.

 

Fried Chicken & Pimento 

Cheese Biscuit ($6) 

Empire State South

999 Peachtree Street Northeast #140

Back in May, Hugh Acheson, former contestant and current judge of “Top Chef,” took top honors in the Best Chef Southeast category awarded by the James Beard Foundation. Acheson’s restaurant, Empire State South, has captivated Atlantans with its energized take on Southern cuisine. While the kitchen serves a mean dinner, don’t overlook this breakfast gem: crispy fried chicken and sharp pimento cheese sitting comfortably between an airy, buttery biscuit. Mornings never tasted so good.

 

H&F Burger ($10)

Holeman & Finch

2277 Peachtree Road Northeast

No burger in the city beats Holeman & Finch’s nationally-recognized one. The design is simple — H&F bread, two 4 oz. patties made of ground chuck and brisket, two slices of Kraft American Singles, julienne red onions and three butter pickles — but the result is a religious revival. They only make 24 burgers a night, Monday through Friday starting at 10 p.m. (get there at 8 to reserve one), but they’re served all day during brunch on Sundays.

 

Rotisserie Chicken ($11)

Las Brasas

310 East Howard Avenue

If there were ever a place Emory students should love, it’s Las Brasas. This Peruvian shack serves up superb rotisserie chicken at prices that would make even a Chinese restaurant nervous. For $6, get half a chicken that feeds two people with sides. For $11, get a whole chicken. Don’t miss out on the herby green sauce that goes with this moist bird. Heads up: the only seating is outside.

 

Lobster Roll (Market Price, $14 at the time)

The Optimist

914 Howell Mill Rd.

Ford Fry (JCT Kitchen, No. 246) opened this nautical-themed restaurant over the summer, and for anyone who thinks a seafood-centric restaurant in a land-locked city is a bad idea, think again. While raw oysters and Georgia shrimp are prime pickings, Fry’s lobster roll is the best in town. Plump lobster meat is stuffed between a buttery bun and served with some greasy chips that pair surprisingly well.

 

Fried Catfish Plate ($14)

Watershed on Peachtree

1820 Peachtree Road Northwest

This landmark Atlanta restaurant closed last year in Decatur only to reopen this year in Buckhead. Joe Truex has replaced Scott Peacock as head chef, and the former kitschy interior now boasts a sleek, woodsy feel. The North Carolina fried catfish is notable for its robust texture. The firecracker green beans prepared with fish sauce make for a fascinating side. To drink, order a glass of Wind Gap from Russian River Valley.

 

Pan-fried Sole Fillets ($25)

Lure

1106 Crescent Ave NE

The Fifth Group Restaurant (Ecco, La Tavola) also opened a seafood-centric restaurant over the summer. Lure’s meaty, pan-fried sole fillets are topped with breadcrumbs and come in a brown-butter caper sauce. For dessert, check out the bread pudding, which is encased in coconut and hides a layer of guava inside.

— By Evan Mah

2 comments

  1. Dooley 6 years ago

    These restaurants, though tasty and delicious, are a bit pretentious. To encourage Emory students to get outside the “Emory bubble” it might be a bit more helpful to steer them in the direction of more casual, budget friendly options. Remember the Emory Wheel is for college kids. For students seeking a more realistic list of restaurants, I suggest doing a quick Yelp search. Most of Atlanta’s amazing diverse food options are low-key, low priced options.

  2. Nicole 6 years ago

    Perhaps the word you were looking for is not pretentious, but rather, sophisticated. And there is nothing wrong with encouraging students to broaden their food horizons. Who wants to eat cheap (mostly uninspiring) meals ALL THE TIME? If you’re telling me the average Emory student can’t afford to branch out and try a Holeman & Finch burger every once in a while, then you are mistaken. After all, isn’t trying new things what college is all about?

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