Evan Amaral

Time slows to a halt in the dog days of summer, as the inevitable boredom of liminal freedom begins to sink in like the gentle heat of the sun. But it’s not always so luminous, as the new film “Summer ...

Directors often get all the credit for successful movies. It’s a problematic notion that often leads to the critical worship of messianic auteurs famous for their meticulous control. However, an army of dedicated craftspeople expend their blood, sweat and tears ...

There is, perhaps, no more potent symbol of the American imagination than the cowboy. Images of 10 gallon hats, wide open prairies and wild horses permeate our popular culture, and stories of these cowboys formed the basis of the first ...

Motherhood, a frequent favorite subject of Hollywood, has been the source of conflict in many a melodrama in film’s early days of glory (see the enduring popularity of stories such as “Mildred Pierce”). But filmmakers — largely male — often ...

“Solo,” the latest installment in the “Star Wars” series, retreads its title character’s legendary shenanigans with occasional bursts of entertainment. Sadly, it’s a pointless motion picture. “Star Wars” has built upon its already massive cultural following since Disney purchased the ...

Cinema is a story told through images. The medium itself was born in the nitrate fire of silence, defined by visual storytelling. With the advent of sound, the audible side of filmmaking became a complement to the visual. Thus, films ...

You won’t hear a more instantly recognizable name in American independent cinema than Wes Anderson. The Austin, Texas-based auteur has carved out his own corner of the cinematic landscape, filling it with his idiosyncratic style and continued cult and mainstream ...

The archetype of the final girl is one as old as slasher film history. Mostly young, virginal women, they are the sharp protagonists that avoid a killer’s blade until the bitter end. However, most horror films don’t take the time ...

In Alexander Mackendrick’s classic film noir “Sweet Smell of Success,” gossip columnist J.J. Hunsecker (Burt Lancaster) describes the protagonist Sidney Falco (Tony Curtis) as a “cookie full of arsenic.” There is no better turn of phrase to describe “Thoroughbreds,” a ...