All posts by "Karishma Mehrotra"

Karishma Mehrotra
Executive Editor
2015-2016 Executive Editor Karishma Mehrotra is a College senior and has been interested in journalism since her freshman year in high school. Her major is journalism and international studies with an unofficial minor in African studies. She became a writer for the news section of the Wheel when she began college and became news editor that year. She has interned at CNN, The Wall Street Journal, the Boston Globe, USA Today, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Palo Alto Weekly and KCBS Radio. She studied abroad in Ghana last semester, which inspired her to join the African dance group on campus, Zuri. She recently worked as a tutor at the Writing Center. She is also a Dean’s scholar.

Karishma Mehrotra is a first-generation Indian-American and the former executive editor of The Emory Wheel. This opinion about the Trump chalkings does not reflect the opinion of the Wheel. Almost ...

Administrators, faculty, staff and student activists from different parts of the campus deliberated on potential solutions that address the 13 “Black Students at Emory” demands at the “Racial Justice Retreat” ...

On May 26, 1969, about 500 people rallied together on the Emory quadrangle. “We are here tonight to announce our intent to fight racism in all its forms on this ...

The Emory College Faculty Senate stands in solidarity with black students and students of color on campus and nationwide, according to one of two statements the Senate passed during their ...

Update 12/2 4:30 p.m.: Senior Vice President and Dean of Campus Life Ajay Nair posted an administrative response to the Black Students at Emory’s demands on his personal Facebook page and Emory’s ...

As hundreds of people snacked on popcorn and sipped coffee in the Georgia Institute of Technology auditorium, Jennice Vilhauer, the director of Emory Clinic’s Outpatient Psychotherapy Program, walked out onto ...

During cabinet meetings, University President James W. Wagner often begins and ends his conversations with a question: “What is the right thing to do?” “That was powerful,” Ajay Nair, senior ...